GO Electrolyte Powders

Endurance sports athletes need to stay hydrated while keeping energy stores up. Our solution? GO Electrolyte – easily dissolve this powder in your water bottle for fast hydration and a supply of carbohydrate to keep your muscles fuelled. Need a mental boost too? We now offer GO Electrolyte + Caffeine with an added 75mg of Caffeine.

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Need State: Hydration

Why is HYDRATION important?

During intense exercise, you sweat and with this you lose electrolytes. Fluid, along with electrolytes need replacing or you will become dehydrated. As little as a 2% reduction in body weight due to sweat loss can cause dehydration, which is associated with an increase in heart rate and body temperature. This can decrease mental stimulation, concentration and overall performance. Appropriate sodium intake along with fluid can optimise hydration, which is especially important when sweat rates are high.


 

When do I need to be thinking about HYDRATION?

Starting exercise in a hydrated state can kick start your performance, helping you to maintain hydration throughout an event. When you start exercising, you should aim to replace 500ml – 1000ml of fluid per hour, depending on your sweat rate. Work this out by weighing yourself before and after a tough session. Afterwards, ensure that you replace the fluid that you have lost, plus extra to ensure that you are hydrated. Don’t consume just water, make sure your drink contains essential electrolytes like those in our hydration products.


 

Key products:

To shop the whole Hydration range, click here.

For more information, watch our video below:

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Science of Carbohydrate Loading for Running

What is carbohydrate loading and why should you do it?

Carbohydrate loading is the process of maximising your muscle and liver glycogen stores by consuming a large quantity of carbohydrate before endurance exercise. Consuming such a large amount of carbohydrate will increase body mass; which could be concerning for runners, however the benefits of greater glycogen stores appear to outweigh the negatives of greater body mass as carbohydrate loading is shown to improve endurance running performance[1,2]. Your body has a limited capacity to store glycogen and it will be broken down and utilised as fuel during high intensity exercise, therefore to optimise performance it is important to maximise your glycogen stores, particularly before competition. 


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When and how should you load carbohydrate?

Carbohydrate loading should take place the day before an endurance event that lasts longer than 90 minutes[3]. One day of carbohydrate loading is shown to be as effective as three days of loading[4]. For optimal glycogen storage the day before the event you should aim to consume 3.6-4.6 grams per pound of body mass (8-10 grams per kilogram of body mass) of primarily high glycemic index (GI) carbohydrate on this day[5]. Ingestion of high GI carbohydrates such as rice, bread, pasta and cereals appears to result in greater glycogen storage than low GI carbohydrates[6] due to being rapidly digested and absorbed. For example an individual weighing 154 lbs (70 kg) should aim to consume 560-700 grams of carbohydrate the day before an event. Ideally this quantity of carbohydrate should be consumed at evenly dispersed periods throughout the day, i.e. every 2-3 hours. Fat content should be kept relatively low in order to aid digestion of carbohydrate. For an example carbohydrate loading day see the table below.  

Time of Day Food (grams of carbohydrate)
Breakfast 100g low fibre breakfast cereal with milk (90g)
1 medium banana (20g)
300ml orange juice (26g)
Morning snack 1 serving of GO Electrolyte (36g)
1 average pot of low fat fruit yogurt (16g)
50g raisins (35g)
Oats and honey snack bar (27g)
Lunch Ham salad sandwich with butter (4 slices of white bread) (66g)
Afternoon snack 1 serving of GO Electrolyte (36g)
1 GO Energy bar (44g)
1 medium banana (20g)
Dinner Spaghetti Bolognese (250g white pasta, 150g tomato & basil sauce, 85g turkey mince) (97g)
3 slices of garlic bread (32g)
Evening snack 1 white bagel with jam (55g)
40g porridge oats with 1 tablespoon of honey (20g)

Total calories: 3570 kcal
Carbohydrate: 620g
Protein: 120g
Fat: 70g


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References


[1] Brewer, J. C., Williams, C., & Patton, A. (1988). The influence of high carbohydrate diets on endurance running performance. European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, 57(6), 698-706

[2] Karlsson, J., & Saltin, B. (1971). Diet, muscle glycogen, and endurance performance. Journal of applied physiology, 31(2), 203-206

[3] Hawley, J. A., Schabort, E. J., Noakes, T. D., & Dennis, S. C. (1997). Carbohydrate-loading and exercise performance: an update. Sports Medicine, 24(2), 73-81

[4] Bussau, V. A., Fairchild, T. J., Rao, A., Steele, P.,&  Fournier, P. A. (2002). Carbohydrate loading in human muscle: an improved 1 day protocol. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 87(3), 290-295

[5] Burke, L. M., Hawley, J. A., Wong, S. H. S., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2011). Carbohydrates for training and competition. Journal of Sport Sciences, 29(sup1), S17-S27

[6] Wee, S. L., Williams, C., Tsintzas, K., & Boobis, L. (2005). Ingestion of a high-glycemic index meal increases muscle glycogen storage at rest but augments its utilization during subsequent exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 99(2), 707-714

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Science of Carbohydrate Loading for Cycling

What is carbohydrate loading and why should you do it?

Carbohydrate loading is the process of maximizing your muscle and liver glycogen stores by consuming a large quantity of carbohydrate before endurance exercise. Consuming such a large amount of carbohydrate may increase body mass by 0.5kg-1kg when stored, which could be concerning for cyclists. However, the benefits of greater glycogen stores appear to outweigh the negatives of greater body mass, as carbohydrate loading is shown to improve endurance cycling performance (1,2). Your body has a limited capacity to store glycogen and it will be broken down and utilized as fuel during high intensity exercise. To optimize performance, it is important to maximize your glycogen stores, particularly before competition.


When and how should you carbohydrate load?

Carbohydrate loading should take place the day before an endurance event that lasts longer than 90 minutes(3). One day of carbohydrate loading is shown to be as effective as three days of loading (4). For optimal glycogen storage the day before the event you should aim to consume 8-10 grams per kilogram of body mass of high glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates (5). Ingestion of high GI carbohydrates such as rice, bread, pasta and cereals appears to result in greater glycogen storage than low GI carbohydrates (6) due to being rapidly digested and absorbed. For example, an individual weighing 154 lbs (70 kg) should aim to consume 560-700 grams of carbohydrate the day before an event. Ideally this quantity of carbohydrate should be consumed across evenly dispersed periods throughout the day, i.e. every 2-3 hours. Fat content should be kept relatively low in order to aid digestion of carbohydrate. For an example of a carbohydrate loading day, see the table below.  (Low fibre choices are also advised to avoid feeling bloated.)

Time of DayFood (grams of carbohydrate)
Breakfast 100g low fibre breakfast cereal with milk (90g)
1 medium banana (20g)
300ml orange juice (26g)
Morning snack1 serving of GO Electrolyte (36g)
1 average pot of low fat fruit yoghurt (16g)
50g raisins (35g)
Oats and honey snack bar (27g)
LunchHam salad sandwich with butter (4 slices of white bread) (66g)
Afternoon snack1 serving of GO Electrolyte (36g)
1 GO Energy bar (44g)
1 medium banana (20g)
DinnerSpaghetti Bolognese (250g white pasta, 150g tomato & basil sauce, 85g turkey mince) (97g)
3 slices of garlic bread (32g)
Evening snack1 white bagel with jam (55g)
40g porridge oats with 1 tablespoon of honey (20g)

Total calories: 3570 kcal
Carbohydrate: 620g
Protein: 120g
Fat: 70g


References

  1. Rauch, L. H. G., Rodger, I., Wilson, G. R., Belonje, J. D., Dennis, S. C., Noakes, T. D., & Hawley, J. A. (1995). The effects of carbohydrate loading on muscle glycogen content and cycling performance. International Journal of Sport Nutrition, 5(1), 25-36
  2. Bergström, J., Hermansen, L., Hultman, E., & Salting, B. (1967). Diet, muscle glycogen and physical performance. Acta Physiologica, 71(2-3), 140-150
  3. Hawley, J. A., Schabort, E. J., Noakes, T. D., & Dennis, S. C. (1997). Carbohydrate-loading and exercise performance: an update. Sports Medicine, 24(2), 73-81
  4. Bussau, V. A., Fairchild, T. J., Rao, A., Steele, P.,&  Fournier, P. A. (2002). Carbohydrate loading in human muscle: an improved 1 day protocol. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 87(3), 290-295
  5. Burke, L. M., Hawley, J. A., Wong, S. H. S., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2011). Carbohydrates for training and competition. Journal of Sport Sciences, 29(sup1), S17-S27
  6. Wee, S. L., Williams, C., Tsintzas, K., & Boobis, L. (2005). Ingestion of a high-glycemic index meal increases muscle glycogen storage at rest but augments its utilization during subsequent exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 99(2), 707-714
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How To Avoid Bonking

How to avoid bonking/ hitting the wall

“Bonking” or “hitting the wall” is one of the worst experiences to have while out training or racing. This happens when you haven’t fueled with enough carbohydrate before or during exercise, and you’ve used up most of the stored carbohydrate (glycogen) within your body. Here, we discuss methods to help prevent this.

Fuel for the work required in training

Carbohydrate intake will depend on the event you’re preparing for. Hard fast training sessions (such as intervals / fartlek training) are more dependent on carbohydrate as a fuel whereas slower steady state runs can be fueled by using more of our own body fat stores. We’re always using some of both fuels, but it’s important to consider the use of fat as a fuel source as using fat during moderate-intensity exercise can “spare” our muscle glycogen stores for when we need them most i.e. hard intense exercise.

Given the concept of carbohydrate periodization (i.e. train smart), our nutritional plan for carbohydrate intake on training days should differ according to what the training goals are for that specific day, hence “fuel for the work required” (1). Some short, low intense sessions could be performed without carbohydrate (e.g having breakfast after and not before morning training) whereas for the hard effort sessions and very prolonged duration sessions, carbohydrate intake is essential. In such instances, carbohydrate should be consumed before, during and after the session. Additionally, “train as you race” sessions where we deliberately practice our race day nutrition strategy should also be practiced. This can teach our muscles how to use both fat and carbohydrate as fuels. The overall result of a periodized plan is that you turn up on race day with a physiological profile that is “ready-to-race”, prolonging our energy stores!

Carbohydrate loading

Focusing on your diet as you taper for your event will help you to maximise your energy stores. You don’t need a depletion phase before you carbohydrate load, and a period of increased carbohydrate intake with a training taper is sufficient to boost your glycogen stores. Follow these guidelines that consider carbohydrate intake based on the length of an event and your body mass (2):

  • Preparing for intense exercise under 90 minutes: 7-12 g/kg (of body mass) of carbohydrate 24 hours prior the event
  • Preparation for events spanning over 90 minutes: 10 – 12 g/kg (of body mass) of carbohydrate per 24 hours, 36 hours before the event
  • Immediate pre event fuelling for events lasting over 60 minutes: 1-4 g/kg (of body mass) of carbohydrate 1-4 hours before exercise

Carbohydrate intake during prolonged exercise

Providing your muscles are loaded with glycogen and you’ve prepared well for your event, this stored glycogen will last for around 90-120 minutes of prolonged exercise dependent on your exercise intensity. Consuming carbohydrate during exercise maintains carbohydrate supply to the muscle as well reducing the reliance on your stored liver and muscle glycogen stores. Additionally, carbohydrate can also have a direct effect on the central nervous system and reduces the perception of effort during exercise. The ability of carbohydrate to stimulate the brain can even be achieved by simply “rinsing” a carbohydrate solution in our mouths, as opposed to actual ingestion.

Follow the below guidelines to ensure you fuel for performance (2)!

  • Brief exercise under 45 minutes: there may be no need to take on fuel during this exercise, focus on preparation
  • Sustained high intensity exercise under 45-75 minutes: fuelling may not be required if you have prepared well. Here, rinsing your mouth with a carbohydrate drink (e.g GO Electrolyte) can be an effective strategy. Rinse for 10 seconds at a time, every 10 minutes or so.
  • Endurance exercise > 90 minutes: Aim to take on 60-90 grams of carbohydrate per hour from multiple carbohydrate sources. 2* GO Isotonic Gels and 1* GO Electrolyte provides 80g of fast digesting carbohydrate. Aim to consume carbohydrate every 20 minutes and remember to start fuelling after 20 minutes of exercise, don’t leave it too late or you will not see the benefits!

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    Find out more about your need for energy with our video below:

      

    Related Articles:

    • Why carbohydrate is king for Endurance Performance
    • The Role of Protein for the Endurance Athlete
    • The Only Truly Isotonic Gel
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      REFERENCES

      1. Impey, S. G., Hammond, K. M., Shepherd, S. O., Sharples, A. P., Stewart, C., Limb, M., & Close, G. L. (2016). Fuel for the work required: a practical approach to amalgamating train‐low paradigms for endurance athletes. Physiological Reports, 4(10), e12803.
      2. Thomas, D. T., Erdman, K. A., & Burke, L. M. (2016). American College of Sports Medicine Joint Position Statement. Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 48(3), 543.
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